The Season of the Heel: Kevin Owens and “Orange is the New Black”

Kevin Owens on Raw; Vee Parker on Orange is the New Black: Each was the villainous centerpiece of an entire season of their show’s run. Both came to save the day by injecting much-needed conflict during periods that could have easily been creative lulls for their respective shows. Vee appeared in OitNB at the beginning of the second season, at a point where the show’s ensemble cast of characters had been established, but outside of individual person-to-person drama, lacked purpose and direction as a group. Kevin Owens appeared on Raw in May, during the heart of what is often a post-Wrestlemania, pre-Summerslam build swoon for WWE. Vee and Owens are thematically similar in several key ways, and each was the perfect villain to shake things up and carry their respective narrative from point A to point C.

Both are corrupters of youth. Vee’s pre-prison drug business was built on exploiting young people who lacked means and support and forcing them to take dangerous, criminal risks. Her predatory instincts are best encapsulated in a scene where she has sex with one of her dealers, who sees her as a mother figure, just moments before sending him into a trap in which she knows he will be killed.

Kevin Owens might not be sending kids out to the street corner, but he has repeatedly made it clear that he has disdain for innocence and idealism as embodied by children. In his concurrent feuds with John Cena and Finn Balor, Owens derided each man by telling them with a smirk that his son looked up to them. This statement communicates two equally important messages: that Owens equates his son’s innocence and the values of his son’s heroes with stupidity, and, in a more sinister turn, that Owens has made it part of his mission to drive his own child to the dark side by tearing down his fundamentally decent heroes.

Many were upset to see Owens on Raw participating in the Brock-Taker pull apart and a six-man tag, saying he had been reduced to “just another guy” after his feud with Cena ended, but at least Owens wasn’t killed like Vee. It can be difficult to let go of great characters when their run is over, even evil ones, but it’s important to understand that their impact is not reduced just because they are no longer on top. Owens and Vee both had brief, spectacular runs that were extremely meaningful because they shook the entire universe in which they lived.

Part of what makes wrestling a great storytelling genre is that characters can be pushed up and down the card with relative fluidity as long as there’s an angle explaining the rises and falls. Is Kevin Owens positioned to be at the top of the Summerslam card? No. Could his budding feud with Cesaro produce great TV and help carry WWE through another traditional swoon once they get past Summerslam and into the NFL season? Yes. So don’t write Kevin Owens’ obituary yet.

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