Owens-Balor: The Title Match of the Century

The build towards Owens-Balor on July 4 in Tokyo has been so impressive because the angle itself is largely just fundamentals. The execution has been such that the journey hasn’t felt formulaic at all, however. The match is built around the most basic raison d’etre of professional wrestling: the championship title. The high-energy babyface Balor has proven he is amongst the best and wants the title as validation of his love and sacrifice. The bully heel Owens has proven he is ruthless and needs to keep the title so he can lord it over people and cover his insecurities. To sweeten the pot, the NXT Championship has been elevated to a level that nobody could’ve expected through its involvement in the Owens-Cena storyline on Monday Night Raw.

It’s really simple wrestling math: Over, worthy, popular babyface + despicable but respected heel + coveted title = money match. (And that formula doesn’t even take into account the “smart mark” anticipation of seeing two world-class workers have a match together!)

What made the build towards July 4 so unique, however, was the fact that both wrestlers were presented as highly-credible stars in completely different ways. The champion Owens was established as a legitimate top dog by feuding with John Cena on Raw, going so far as to score a pinfall win over the face of our era at Elimination Chamber. This made Kevin Owens the biggest major league cross-promotional wrestling star since at least Ken Shamrock in the early days of UFC and perhaps as far back as the territorial era. Being portrayed as a beast in both NXT and WWE proper at the same time elevated Kevin Owens from “indy star and developmental champion” to “World Champion-level star.”

On the other hand, Finn Balor’s journey toward this match has been much more about talking than wrestling, and, at times, much more about Fergal Devitt than Finn Balor. The “Finn Balor: The Demon Revealed” promotional packages that aired over the last three weeks of NXT set a new standard for character development in wrestling. They combined the best aspects of an HBO boxing promo, a handmade documentary, and an ESPN “30 for 30” piece. The videos had just enough of that WWE polish to look highly professional without feeling phony or over-produced.

What “The Demon Revealed” did more effectively than anything that’s aired on Raw since the build toward Taker-Michaels 2 at Wrestlemania XXVI, however, was make you care about the match on a personal level. Introducing Fergal Devitt as a human being not just a wrestler, having other familiar faces put him over as a decent guy, and showing clips of him chasing his dream around the world added a bonus layer on top of the classic babyface + heel + title formula. NXT fans already loved and respected Balor as an exciting athlete, but now they are rooting for him on a personal and professional level as well.

NXT may be developmental, but this is the best angle in wrestling.

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